Making Pig Products more Personable

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KR Darling Downs I; © Ian Poole, 1980

It is 1980 and my fledgling photographic business is grateful for any assignments thrust my way.

My close mate, the Art Director, turns up at my Studio in the old pink church, with a set of water colour renderings that he has just had drawn at the direction of the client.  The Client thought that it would be a good idea to show the source of his product in a cute and humorous way.

The source was a pig!     And the product was bacon! 

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KR Darling Downs II; © Ian Poole, 1980

That is how the KR Darling Downs Christmas Card Assignment was launched.  My reservations about the quality of the concept are more pronounced today than they were way back in another century.

After all, an advertising photographer is just a hired camera sitting around waiting for a commission.

My job was to reproduce the artwork as accurately as possible for printing of Christmas Cards and a possible brochure.  This was a time of black and white newspapers, and whilst it may have been reproduced in the Toowoomba Chronicle, that was not a concern on this occasion.  Working at the 115 Warren Street, Fortitude Valley Studio, and using my Sinar P2 (5×4″) screen-shot-2016-12-21-at-5-34-12-pmcamera, Kodak Ektachrome transparency film and a Kodak Color Control Patch – I more than had this assignment covered!

Founded in 1911 as the Darling Downs Bacon Co-operative, KR Darling Downs eventually closed in 2006 putting 350 people out of work.  The company was a large employer in the Toowoomba region.

My connection was via the advertising agency Hertz Walpole and its art director Gary Edgar.  Over later years I was to produce some food photography for brochures.  My everlasting memory was of executives from the bacon company driving down from Toowoomba bringing packages of product for use in the photography sessions, and their boredom eventually culminating with their disappearance from the studio around lunchtime to visit a hotel.  Fortunately not to be seen again that day!

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KR Darling Downs III; © Ian Poole, 1980

Agency:  Hertz Walpole, Brisbane
Art Director:  Gary Edgar
Artist:  Unknown
Client:  KR Darling Downs Pty Ltd, Toowoomba

You may also enjoy
– https://poolefoto.wordpress.com/2015/12/12/ghosts-from-christmas-past/
https://poolefoto.wordpress.com/tag/cassells-fashion-brisbane/

These transparencies (IAN POOLE does PHOTOGRAPHY file #4737) (and many others), will become part of an online searchable database at the John Oxley Historical Library within the State Library of Queensland during 2017.

 

 

All our own work

An earnest debate amongst Australian professional photographers is currently ensuing online regarding the legitimacy of using second and third party professionals to prepare entries for photography awards.

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Story Bridge + Bird; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1995.

In this instance specifically, whether professional retouchers should be able to work on an awards entry and whether the resulting modified photograph still remains within the original photographer’s integrity of ownership.

The debate resonates on many levels.

Firstly, the Australian professional institute has encouraged its members to enter the awards with a view to improving professional standards across the broad range of the industry.  Comparing current entries with those of 30+ years ago, this has been achieved well beyond the imagination of the two or three Australian photography industry founding fathers’ fondest thoughts, wishes or hopes.

Secondly, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of first time professional photographers practising their craft without any degree of formal training.

And thirdly, many of these new industry members are trying their hand at entering professional awards for the first time using photographic images that were commercially sound enough for sale to clients – but then fail to attract high assessments from the panel of judges.  The antipodean professional awards of New Zealand and Australia present some of the highest standards in photography, as evidenced by the success of some of their participants on a world stage, so where does the disconnect occur, and why?

That third point is the basis on which many photographers are now questioning their own poor results and looking for answers in places other than deep introspection. Some are rooting suspicion from their discovery that some entered photographs have received post-production treatment that might not all have been the work of the entrant.  A lack of formal training in photography means that some fundamental knowledge of the history of the art is absent, missing in action, from their perspective.  This colours their judgment, hiding the real issue.

Right from the earliest days of photography there was a dependence on skilled third party assistance for the photographer to be able to produce saleable portrait images.  From the late 19th century through the early 20th century the production methods were similar, albeit the materials used varied.  The photographer (usually a male) exposed sensitised material and worked with the clients in The Gallery and behind the scenes vast numbers of staff (mostly female) worked on the production of the finished product.  Some photos of these areas in very large studios indicate an almost Dickensian workhouse nature. In a very real sense however, both sides of the production process were equally harrowing as work places.

The widespread use of colour materials in the mid-twentieth century brought about a dramatic change to the business model.  A host of colour processing laboratories created a revolution where photographers concentrated on finding clients and taking photographs while relying on their finished print production being entirely done by laboratories.  The resulting images were really only packaged back at the studio for delivery to clients.

This reliance on laboratories by domestic photographers was echoed in the commercial world.  The difference being, that instead of processing negatives these laboratories worked with transparency film and offered additional skills for sale.  Compositing two or more transparencies into one, adding text to a transparency, blending several images to create one finished result – something that any half trained photography student could do today in minutes with Photoshop – had to be sent to an expert or experts (often in another city) for completion.

My personal experience of having seen most of the Australian professional awards judged was that this manner of production was always perfectly acceptable.  Whilst the viewer often marvelled at the technical skill required to achieve some of the effects, nevertheless it was the brilliance of the concept, or the execution of the original exposure, that was being assessed and attributed to the entrant.  Today, the common practice of having one’s award entries printed and finished by a master printer is not only accepted, but tacitly encouraged. Judges don’t expect entrants to be master printers, so why should they expect the same photographers to be master retouchers?

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Tokyo Opera House; © Ian Poole, 2012.

The disappointment some new entrants to the awards system face is the discovery that their ‘successful’ commercial output does not rate highly in a peer review competitive situation.  Money from clients (albeit the most important yardstick for a commercial enterprise) while essential, is also on a par with lavish praise from one’s own mother.  The success of the trans-Tasman competitions is that the quality bar has been raised to a very high level.  Something to be applauded, not dragged down to a lesser level by adding the criterion that if the image was adequate enough to sell, it is therefore good enough to be applauded and awarded by a jury of our peers.

Content, intent, story-telling, description, emotion, memory, originality, technique and many other signifiers are the harbingers of an award winning photograph.  Judges tend to wait and hope, looking for photographs that bring a special message and trusting that they will be able to recognise these images when revealed in the dance of assessment in those quiet rooms.

Long may that expectation reign.


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This essay first appeared in f11 Magazine :: for PHOTOGRAPHERS and AFICIONADOS, p148, issue 57 :: August, 2016.

The Failed TV Campaign

 

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Channel O; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1980.

When you work closely with one or two major clients it is possible to become part and parcel of their visual sounding board and assist in producing new ideas or presentations.

Such was the attempt at winning the sales and promotion account with the Brisbane TV station Channel O.  (Now Network 10, Brisbane)

My good friend (and valuable photography client) Gary Edgar, was Art Director at the Brisbane office of the Hertz Walpole Advertising Agency.  As was the case then and now, agencies would regularly pitch ideas to clients seeking to gain their advertising budget.

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Gary Edgar; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1980.

Whilst elsewhere in Australia the Channel O network had become Channel 10 in January 1980, in Brisbane the network still traded under the Channel O banner.  A situation that continued in Brisbane until 10 September 1988.

This campaign had everything going for it.  The art director and the photographer playing major roles.  A friendly TV cameraman (he had access to a camera) and of course that staple of the 1980s – a pretty female face wearing a swim suit!   This was August 1980 after all.

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Channel O Model; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1980.

The model’s name has been sadly lost over the decades, but it is highly likely that she was the receptionist at the advertising agency.

Gary was a keen sailor and it naturally followed that both he and his 14′ Hobie Cat had to feature in a proposal that was aimed at sun, sand and water loving Brisbane audiences.

The water activity shots were photographed at Shorncliffe on the Redcliffe Peninsula during one of our regular Sunday afternoon sailing sessions.  Gary wasn’t the only one with a Hobie Cat – it was an activity that we both indulged.

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Shorncliffe; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1980.

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“O” for the Glasses; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1980.

The studio photographs were taken at the Old Pink Church in Warren Street, Fortitude Valley, Brisbane.  The electric motorised Hasselblad (500EL – same as the one taken by NASA to the moon) in the top photograph, was a cantankerous old beast that was used mainly in the Studio.  Too big, too heavy, too unreliable to take outside!

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Eyewitness News; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1980.

 

 

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Gary Edgar (alternate); © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1980.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


These photographs form part of the Poole Collection held by the John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland.  #5072 – Hertz Walpole Advertising, these transparencies (and thousands of other negatives and transparencies) will be available for public access within the next twelve months.   These materials, as well as films and digital stories are available for viewing in the John Oxley Library Reading Room or online via their catalogue OneSearch.


 

Sabcar – a Brisbane Model Agency

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Cheryl and Andrena; © Ian Poole, Brisbane March 1977

An opportunity to re-connect with the Principals and members of the Brisbane based model agency Sabcar , is also an opportunity to see some old photographs.

Most of these shots were taken to produce a major poster promoting all the talent at the Agency at that time – March 1977.

Produced at my studio at the old pink church in Warren Street, Fortitude Valley, it was a major exercise in logistics.

The negatives from this (and all my other commercial photographic output) is now stored at the John Oxley Library within the State Library of Queensland.

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Cigarette; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, March, 1977.

Any assistance in putting names to faces would be greatly appreciated.

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Denise Moran; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, March 1977.

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Narelle Meuller; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, March 1977.

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Gloria McQuilty and ?; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, March 1977.

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Karen Radel; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, March 1977.

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Julie-Anne Ross; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, March 1977

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Michelle Calcutt and Denise Moran; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, March 1977

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Albert Park; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, March 1977

 

On a technical note, the majority of portraits in this very large project were shot on the medium format Hasselblad camera system using a 6x6cm black and white negative.  Both Kodak and Ilford films were used.  There were some shots taken using a Nikon 35mm outfit.

Additionally the bulk of the assignments were taken in the Warren Street Studios with a handful of sessions taken at Albert Park.

 

 

Further stories featuring Sabcar Model Agency are told here:

 


 

 

Ghosts from Christmas Past

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Poole Yule + Cindy Limque; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, c1977

There was a time when I spent a lot of time creating Christmas cards and photographic invitations for parties.

The above shot was created very early in my career at 115 Warren Street, Fortitude Valley and I was very proud of the old pink church that I shared with David McCarthy.  It took every piece of lighting that I possessed to illuminate the interior of the church, and using Kodak Ektachrome type B (Tungsten) film to record the lighting correctly but enhance the blue of the twilight, I felt that I was working at the extremes of creative photography.  Image my horror to discover either that year or the next, that a Melbourne photographer had used a similar technique and shot for their card!

Ian-Poole-Brisbane-PhotographerSharing a studio space as I did meant that David and I were able to co-host a Christmas party each year and share the costs etc between us.  The need to create an interesting invitation that would attract the attention of our respective clients was paramount.  Various advertising agency creative directors were kind in offering us their writing and art direction skills, but Kevin Fielding and Gary Edgar were two who gave generously of their time and skills.  Ian-Poole-Brisbane-PhotographerAdditionally there was a big input from our respective staff, not only assisting in the production and shooting of the image to be used, but the complex production of the text and subsequent printing of the photographs.  The invitations were always sent out as 10×8″ black and white prints to reinforce the fact that we were creative advertising photographers.

The complexities of sharing the hosting of such a party was illustrated in many ways.  There was a time when Brisbane was a two brewery town – Castlemaine Perkins Fourex and Carlton United.  The two respective advertising agencies were our clients albeit not necessarily for photographing beer.  As was the custom of the time, our parties were held in a large courtyard under a large poinciana tree, with a BBQ in one corner and several plastic rubbish bins filled with ice and cans of beer.  Knowing that the majority of our guests drank XXXX beer and not wishing to offend the Agency representing VB beer, we spent the night surreptitiously scattering VB cans into the bins so as to appear as if the beers were disappearing equally. Ian-Poole-Brisbane-Photographer

This was the late 1970s and early 1980s – the Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen years in Queensland.  Whilst the gerrymander (I have referenced the ABC’s Antony Green for a succinct explanation) gave the ruling Country/National political party a stranglehold on Queensland politics, elections were nevertheless strongly fought.  So it came to pass that our Christmas Party was held the night before a Queensland election and we had the amazing scene of three sitting members of Parliament fighting each other to work the tongs at the BBQ, thereby being in a position to offer an opinion with every hamburger cooked.  After some consternation at this, David and I eventually chose to avoid the BBQ that night and concentrated on having a drink with clients hoping that the festivities did not turn ugly.

I seem to recall that the gerrymander won again the next day!


 

Blasts of the Past

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Cycling Advertisement #1; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1975.

Recently I showed a set of photographs taken for a commercial client some forty years ago.  These were mostly Ektachrome colour transparencies, processed properly in Kodak approved chemistry and then stored in conditions appropriate for the extremes of sub-tropical Brisbane.  They had fared well over the decades.

In the course of laying out the blog I had cause to wonder whether my photographic style had changed over the years.  The assignment was to illustrate a range of bicycles and an equivalent range of riders showing diversity in age and gender. It was interesting to note that I had shot a good mix of close-up and long shots, utilising my wide and telephoto lenses.  What did surprise me was the fact that the framing of the shots was not dissimilar to work that I have done recently.  I guess that our craft is a moving feast, and that stylistic treatments will roll in and out of use over time so is this mere coincidence or a constant?

One would assume that a lifetime of experience, the influence of all those lecturers at conventions, and the comments of judges about my images in competitions, might result in a gradual change in style, if not technique.

Having spent vast amounts of money stocking a library with photographic books by people such as Sam Haskins, Helmut Newton, Herb Ritts, Jeanloup Sieff, and Guy Bourdin; and only replicating their influences in my private work, not my commercial output, there surely must have been other influences along the way.

A mid life crisis driven foray into academic study left me with a visual arts postgraduate degree.  Probably the most life changing point in my photographic career.  Good lecturers had pointed me to other genres of fine art as well as towards obscure photographic practitioners.  I was reading books about photography that did NOT contain photographs, and the photographers mentioned above became slightly less relevant to me.  My ability to assess, evaluate, appraise and critique became more finely honed with the discipline of academic research.  These are traits that I hope stand me in good stead today.

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Politically Incorrect Xennox Advertisement; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1980.

But back to the transparencies of bicycles from the seventies.  They were not of a quality that would demand an immediate assignment commission from a high flying New York advertising agency – but nor was the product from Australia’s highest selling cycle manufacturer.  These were shots taken early in my career and at the time they were the distillation of self taught technique and the early results of skills passed on by practitioners of the professional Institute which I had recently joined.  The years I had spent buying, and trawling through, vast quantities of magazines represented visual research, today that would take place online.  I was working with a young and ambitious art director who was as keen as I was to explore a good idea using our mutual client’s products.  Team work usually enhances creativity and close collaboration does tend to prevent unpleasant surprises later on in the process.

Would I approach this same assignment differently today?  I would ask for more money – I deserve it!  I would still shoot the same variety of images.  I would be forced to pay for access to the same botanic gardens.  Probably I would direct some model expressions differently, but then I am still surprised that a couple of the poses still hold up – even if the clothes indicate historic images.  I would direct the models to wear helmets – but that is a bureaucratic imposition.  While I feel that my skill-sets and techniques have dramatically improved over the years, my instincts tell me that when it comes to directing talent, setting a scene and then recording what takes place, nothing very much has changed.  I used the best materials, and the best processing laboratory available at the time – as is evidenced by the fact that I was able to scan the results easily today.  My data asset management (DAM) is good, as I can identify, date and retrieve the assignment.

Questioning one’s own style is a difficult proposition, but probably should be done on a regular basis if we are to stay ahead of the photographic pack.  Revisiting work from days gone by can, at first, be excruciating with props, clothing and hairstyles immediately dating the images and shortly thereafter calling their instructive usefulness into question.

However, looking beyond this, looking a layer or two below the surface can deliver a revelation or two – so I recommend it.


Screen Shot 2015-10-26 at 8.35.45 amThis essay first appeared in f11 Magazine :: for PHOTOGRAPHERS and  AFICIONADOSp150, issue 48, October 2015.

My First APPA Silver Award c1977

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APPA Silver Award; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1977

Entering the second Photography Awards held by the Institute of Australian Photography (IAP) in 1977 was as nerve racking as it was entering the APPA held in Melbourne by the Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) last year (2015).  The IAP was the precursor of the AIPP – Australia’s premier professional photography body.

My very first Silver Award came from an image taken during the following campaign shot at my Warren Street Studio (Brisbane).

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Harlequin Music Centre #5; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1976

Whilst this is a different frame from which the Award print was made, it is interesting to note the Hasselblad format Ektachrome transparency and the information contained therein.  I was still using Lowel Tota lights prior to investing in a commercial set of Bowens flash gear.  Very effective lighting but terribly hot in a Queensland Studio.  But it was an easy way to get a lot of lighting for little investment.

Harlequin Music (later to become Toombul Music Centre) and later still closing its doors in 2008, was the campaign client.  My client was good friend Gary Edgar, Art Director at Pemberton Advertising Agency.

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Harlequin Music #3; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1976

Whilst some of the shots were to be used in press advertisements, the primary reason for the shooting session was to create some strong, powerful images to be used as large wall decorations.  The Art Director and I were concerned that normal continuous tone photographs would not  have much impact.  I had been experimenting with a black and white technique called tone line drop out.  This high contrast technique (or line conversion) was more commonly used in commercial printing and produced a negative/positive that had little or no grey – just black and white.

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Harlequin Music #1; © Ian Poole, Brisbane c1976

The actual shoot was fairly big deal for me, as it involved gathering a large amount of stock and props as well as hiring a specialist model.  Judy Addis was a Jamaican born model who was working for a local model agency (June Dally Watkins) and had a secondary job as a jazz singer.

She was perfect for the processing technique we had in mind.  From the tests that we had done in the Studio darkroom I realised the number of conversions needed was going to stretch the time of my assistant (Cindy Limque) and Wayne Eeeles (who worked in the David McCarthy Studio) was drafted to assist.  The resultant shots from the session were then converted to prints via high contrast negatives for the client selection.  To enable a photographically inexperienced client to pick and choose, a huge volume of material had to be produced.

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Harlequin Music #2; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1977

Note the music cassettes and cartridges being placed into the toaster – Art Director sense of humour!

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Harlequin Music #4; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1977

The ease in which Photoshop has done away with these arcane is amazing.  Such skills were held by the most experienced of darkroom workers.

I am indebted to Wayne Eeles for not only assisting with the treatment in the first instance, but corroborating the details recently, as my memory fades – unlike the well processed black and white negatives from which these scans were made!

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Harlequin Music #5; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1977  (Oh to have had Photoshop to strip out the light stand waaay back in 1977!)

 

 

 


 

In a Tiger Moth over the Gold Coast

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Tiger Moth #1; © Ian Poole, c1978

The de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth is a rapidly disappearing aeronautical masterpiece from the pre-World War II 1930s production line.

I was fortunate, in the late 1970s, to be commissioned to photograph the last two remaining Tiger Moths flying on the Gold Coast.  They were taking tourists on brief tours up and down the surf side of the Surfers Paradise high rise towers.  The take off point was inside the old Surfers Paradise motor racing track at Carrara.

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Pilot’s Thumbs Up; © Ian Poole, c1978.

The brief was to document one of the Tiger Moths from within the other craft, showing the open cockpit and the biplane construction with the struts visible.

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Self-Portrait with Concentration; © Ian Poole, c1978.

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Opposition Seaplanes; © Ian Poole, c1978.

Shooting with a Nikon F3 and 28mm and 20mm Nikkor lenses, I was able to get some amazing shots.  As we were traveling at relatively slow speeds (probably around 60-80 knots) the pilots were traveling in close formation.  Initially a little unnerving, but the photographer in me was impressed that I was shooting with wide angle lenses and the risk of lens shake was dramatically reduced.  Whilst aloft we managed to document a pair of the opposition company’s sea planes also flying in formation.  This was a company that I was to work for at a later time.

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Gold Coast Looking South Along the Spit; © Ian Poole, c1978.

Film used was the ever reliable Kodak Ektachrome transparency.


Swimwear Fashion, 1975 Style

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Cribb & Foote Catalogue #1; © Ian Poole, Brisbane, 1975.  Michelle Adamson_right (Dallys Model Agency)

Whilst the photographic production in advertising doesn’t change all that much, the fashion that is portrayed certainly does.  In this October 1975 assignment for former Brisbane advertising agency, Duthies Advertising, a simple black and white image was being created for the (also) former Ipswich Department store Cribb and Foote.  The iconic Cribb & Foote Ltd was purchased by the Walter Reid group.

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Cribb & Foote Catalogue #II; © Ian Poole, 1975.

An analysis of the negative is also informative.  It is a negative exposed in a Hasselblad 500CM – note the double V indents on the left hand side of the full frame.  Film was Kodak Plus-X, exposed at 100 ISO and lit by Strobe 1000 and Bowens 2000 Quad packs.  The Strobe was a now long gone British design electronic flash unit.  Robust and the small brother of the much larger 5000 joule studio unit.  The Bowens was the relatively inexpensive work horse of those times; and probably a rare few are still in use today.  Also note the bag of horse feed and the Norco Fruit Yoghurt boxes in the background of the studio.  Both remnants of previous assignments.  Such was the variety of a start-up advertising/commercial studio.

Brisbane, with its sub-tropical weather, has always been a good location to hire bikini models.  These girls were all from the Brisbane office of the Sydney based Dallys Model Agency.

For more stories behind the vintage photographs see –

A Hard Day’s Work in the Park

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Botanic Gardens Bicycles I; © Ian Poole, 1975. (Denise Moran and Gary Edgar)

The life of an advertising photographer can bring many different work places and complex exercises in logistics and model direction.

Such was this series of illustrations for a bicycle distributor shot in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens early in my career.  The shoot was firmly controlled by the Art Director from the Brisbane office of Pemberton Advertising – my friend Gary Edgar.  The only paid talent was the young girl hired from a model agency.

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Botanic Gardens Bicycles II; © Ian Poole, 1975.

Many thanks to Denise Moran (Sabcar Model and girlfriend), Francis O’Brien (long suffering receptionist and all round good egg – Frank where are you, and please contact me……), Doug the ABC technician (equally where are you today and please contact me).  How the bikes were transported to the Gardens has been lost in the annals of time.  I can report that this was a time when four hours of riding and photographing bikes did NOT bring park rangers tumbling out of the bushes demanding permits, park fees or threatening incarceration.

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Botanic Gardens Bicycles III; © Ian Poole, 1975.  (Denise Moran, Doug the ABC Technician and young Sabcar model)

As is common with all start-up photography businesses I was confronted with a client brief that wanted EVERYTHING and had a budget that would barely encourage you to get out bed in the morning!  The brief called for a range of photographs illustrating bicycle use across a range of ages – and naturally was to be pleasant to view and show fun.  There were no lyrca clad bodies called for in this series of shots.

Nothing has changed in forty years.

Working with both 6x6cm Hasselblad and an F3 Nikon outfit, and attempting to document in both black and white and colour transparency, it was a case of using almost every piece of equipment that I then owned.  The 200mm Nikon lens was longer than my 150mm Hasselblad lens and was pressed into use to achieve the Art Director’s demand for long shots across the duck pond.  Whereas the 50mm Hasselblad Distagon worked perfectly to achieve Botanic Gardens Bicycles I – look for the double notches on the left hand side of the illustration proving Hasselblad use.

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A Tender Biking Moment; © Ian Poole, 1975

Fortunately the light was soft (insofar as Brisbane sub-tropical light can be) and the exposures for the transparency film (Kodak Ektachrome) were not too difficult to monitor during the afternoon.  Looking at both the black and white negatives and the transparencies I am pleased to report that the exposures were uniform and well exposed.  Obviously some careful metering done during the assignment.

I have no memory of taking a European holiday on the proceeds of this assignment, but I do recall that there are probably worse ways of spending an afternoon working.  I apologise here for the bell-bottoms, the flares, the stripes and the wild and woolly hairstyles.

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Tender Biking Moment II; © Ian Poole, 1975.

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Art Director Giving Posing Directions; © Ian Poole, 1975.

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Deep in the Forest; © Ian Poole, 1975.   (Francis O’Brien and Gary Edgar)